Ruger No 1 laminated single shot

Are single-shot rifles less accurate than bolt-actions?


Q: My uncle gave me a Ruger No 1 light sporter model in .270 that he had no more use for. It has only fired 20 shots, all at deer, and is in tip-top condition. 

Recently I read that single-shot rifles aren’t as accurate as bolt-actions due to the two-piece stock. Is this true? 

Do you think I should trade the No 1 on a new Ruger M77 in .270?

Jack Cassidy

A: Single-shot rifles are considered to be less accurate than bolt-action rifles because their two-piece stocks offer less firm bedding. This is a broad judgement, though, and I know of single-shots that shoot tight groups and provide exceptional accuracy.

I’ve used some Ruger No 1s that were capable of ½ MOA groups, but will admit that if a Ruger No 1 isn’t shooting well, it’s harder to tune than an inaccurate bolt-action because of its two-piece stock.

You can get fine accuracy from a properly bedded No 1. Don’t take everything you read as being gospel. 

Shoot your No 1 at a target before you race to trade it on an M77.

 

 

 


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Nick Harvey

The late Nick Harvey (1931-2024) was one of the world's most experienced and knowledgeable gun writers, a true legend of the business. He wrote about firearms and hunting for about 70 years, published many books and uncounted articles, and travelled the world to hunt and shoot. His reloading manuals are highly sought after, and his knowledge of the subject was unmatched. He was Sporting Shooter's Technical Editor for almost 50 years. His work lives on here as part of his legacy to us all.

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