Schultz & Larsen Victory


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The Schultz & Larsen Victory, with switch barrels, is made as well as its predecessors.

The company of Schultz & Larsen in Otterup, Denmark has been making rifles since the early 1900s, but these were mostly bolt-action target rifles. They didn’t acheive prominence until the early 1950s when they began making a centrefire bolt-action rifle, and thereby hangs a tale!

Philip-B.Sharpe, a well known rifleman, reloader and writer authored two books – The Complete Guide To Handloading and The Rifle In America, which became classics. During World War II, Phil Sharpe was an officer in the U.S Army’s Ordnance Department, where he had an unprecedented opportunity to get firsthand information on continental arms and ammunition factories and their products. A rimless experimental French 7mm semi-auto military cartridge got his attention and he took a cast of the chamber. When he got back to the States after the war, he worked through the late 1940s and early 1950s to design a 7mm belted magnum round based on the French prototype. Two others who contributed to the development of the new cartridge were Richard.F.Hart and Niels Larsen.

Recognized as a worldwide authority on arms and ammuntion, Sharpe’s reputation influenced both Norma and Schultz & Larsen to become involved in the project; Norma made special cases for the project and Schultz and Larsen designed and made an entirely new rifle for the cartridge which was named the 7x61mm Sharpe & Hart. By 1955 Norma was loading the 7×61 S&H as a commercial cartridge which was chambered in the S&L Model 54J.


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