The CZ 455 offers four interchangeable chamberings including .22WRM.

Likes the .22 Magnum


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Q:  Last  year  I bought a CZ 455 Classic in .22  Magnum,  mainly  because of your writings which showed a preference for the .22  WMR over the .17 HMR. Like you I find it better for all around  use on everything from foxes to goats and even mid-size pigs.  Obviously, shots must be well-placed, but I’ve found it performs  well out to about 125 metres or so. What is the best distance to  zero a .22 Magnum? What can you tell me about the .22 WMR?
Rodney Powell
A:  During its 55 year existence the .22 WMR has been loaded with bullets as heavy as 50 grains and as light as 30 grains, but I’ve  found the 40gn the most versatile. The .22 WMR extends the  maximum effective range beyond that of the .22 Long Rifle to  about 125 metres. While 70 metres is the best range to zero a .22  LR, the .22 WMR is best sighted in for 100 metres. Then the  40 gn bullet is about 25mm high at 50 metres and down 64mm at  150. That’s a very satisfactory  trajectory for small to medium  game.  Starting out with 325 ft/lb of energy, the 40gn bullet  hits as hard at 125 metres as the .22 LR at the muzzle. Larger  animals such as goats and pigs are not beyond the .22 WMR’s  capabilities at ranges out to 100 metres. For picking off rabbits  and whistling foxes, however, I like the extra shocking power of  the Winchester Supreme 30gn bullet at 2250fps; it really lowers  the boom on them.


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40 shares, 32 points

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Nick Harvey

Nick Harvey is one of the world's most experienced and knowledgeable gun writers, a true legend of the business. He has been writing about firearms and hunting for more than 65 years, has published many books and uncounted articles, and has travelled the world to hunt and shoot. His reloading manuals are highly sought after, and his knowledge of the subject is unmatched. He has been Sporting Shooter's Gun Editor for longer than anyone can remember. Nick lives in rural NSW, Australia.

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